The Arch's Roman Numerals

It’s funny when you notice something that you never have before. Walking from the Eastern side of the Park towards the Arch the other day, I noticed, for the first time, that there are Roman … Read more…

Garibaldi Uncovered!

I’m not certain how long the statue of Giuseppe Garibaldi was covered in that somewhat atrocious bright blue cloak but, at some point, between when I posted about the status of Phase II on Friday … Read more…

Suze Rotolo 1943-2011

From New York Times: Suze Rotolo, who became widely known for her romance with Bob Dylan in the early 1960s, strongly influenced his early songwriting and, in one of the decade’s signature images, walked with … Read more…

Washington Square Park's Garibaldi Statue Moved!

Garibaldi Moved!
Garibaldi Old Location to Left
Garibaldi Original Location (Before Move)

The Giuseppe Garibaldi Statue at Washington Square Park was moved last week from its position facing west (looking toward the fountain, his back was to Washington Square East). The Garibaldi Statue was designed by Giovanni Turini and erected in 1888. It was refurbished once but not moved (hard to find info on that but there was a plaque outlining it at the Park – American Express financed it at the time).

Some background on the Garibaldi statue from Emily Kies Folpe in her book, It Happened on Washington Square below. Interesting note that Garibaldi was approached by Abraham Lincoln at the start of the Civil War to command a Union army corps. In response, one of Garibaldi’s stipulations was that Lincoln commit to abolishing slavery. This was not agreed to. Garibaldi declined.

The historic Italian presence around the Square accounts for the great bronze statue standing east of the fountain — the figure of Giuseppe Garibaldi, commander of the insurrectionary forces in Italy’s struggle for unification. Garibaldi was one of the greatest guerrilla generals in history and the most popular Italian patriot of his time. After fighting for Giuseppe Mazzini’s short-lived Roman Republic, he sought asylum in the United States where he lived for two years on Staten Island. Returning to his homeland in 1851, he led his red-shirted volunteer army on campaigns that helped bring about a unified Italy twenty years later.

At Garibaldi’s death in 1882, the Italo-Americano newspaper opened a subscription list to raise funds for a monument honoring the general. Public sculpture was one of the most popular art forms of the nineteenth century

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