Baby Red-Tailed Hawk at Washington Square Leg Entangled – For Now, Intervention Pending

Rosie and Baby Hawks
Majorly adorable

First Mama Hawk Violet’s troubles with her leg band, now new baby hawk above Washington Square is having issues with her leg being entangled in a plastic bag in the nest …

The story from the New York Times(May 5):

For the last three days, one of the baby red-tailed hawks in Washington Square Park has had one leg tangled in a white plastic bag, causing panic among Hawk Cam fans about her well-being.

A team of wildlife experts, including the executive director of NYC Audubon, Glenn Phillips, has been closely monitoring the situation and working out how best to reach the baby hawk should it become necessary to intervene. The plan, for now, is to wait until next week before taking action on the nest.

“We all agree that the chick is not in any immediate danger, and that there is a good chance that the chick will free itself from the bag,” Mr. Phillips said in an e-mail.

But, he added, if by next week the eyas has not freed itself from the disposable bag, then a Long Island-based wildlife rehabilitator, Bobby Horvath, will attempt a rescue with a long-poled net.

It seems like some lessons were learned from last time.

Commenters at the Times‘ story had valid suggestions –

from mricle from the Bronx: “If we can ban smoking in public parks and beaches, we can ban disposable plastic bags. Even though paper bags kill trees, they certainly cause less pollution and wildlife issues, and are mostly biodegradable.”

from Sarah from Brooklyn: “Maybe this will be a wake up call to people about the evils of plastic bags!”

I haven’t written about this year’s hawks’ nest or the now growing baby hawks partly because I’m still sad over Violet’s death. For certain, new mom (and Bobby’s new mate) Rosie is really interesting and fun to watch but there was something very special about Violet. I felt for many of the hawk watchers whether there were new baby hawks this year was paramount, and, as long as there was a replacement mate, that was what mattered. I’m sure that’s not how it was – but that’s how it at times appeared. (Not targeting any specific person by any means…)

I never quite realized how intrusive the camera is in the nest. With all sophisticated technology available today, I wonder — could it be a bit less ‘in their faces?’

Photo: D. Bruce Yolton/Urban Hawks Blog

Archive at WSP Blog on Violet, Bobby and Pip